The Fruto Project

 

Fruto, California

Is in Glenn County, 19 miles northwest of Willows on State Highway 162. It is between  -122°30'00" and - -122°22'30", and  39°29'53",  39°37'23". Other: Glenn county FIPS: 06021. California FIPS: 06. Area code: 530. GMT: -8.

Before the town was laid out there was a railroad line with a terminus called Fruto and also a nearby company called the Fruto Land Improvement Company. According to Glenn County Place Names, Fruto’s name stems from the fruit orchards of the area. But this is not correct. The word “fruto” in spanish does not mean fruit. It means produce. And, the streets in the original town plat map bear this out: Olive, Vine, Cherry, Oak, Orange, Chestnut, Walnut, and Fig. All of them illustrative of the great plans the founders had for this area.

Chronological History

1878 

The Northern Railroad reached Willows 26 September 1878.

1884-1888

In 1884 plans began for a branch railroad from Willows to the coast by way of Elk Creek and Grindstone canyon. The hope was that the railroad would take advantage of the great fruit and wool growing in the county and on the coast range the sugar pine and redwood lumbers. That would bring mills to Willows.

1886-1887

On September 6, the Westside and Medocino Railroad is incorporated. and on October 26, 1886 Turon & Knox of Sacramento was awarded the contract for grading the new branch[i]. The wooden-wheeled scrapers were pulled by mule power. The scrapers hung from the wheel axle and they were tipped up to hold the dirt while the wheels carried the dirt to its destination. In April 1887 the grading was about completed and track laying began in March 1888. This work was done by Chinese labor[ii].

 

1888

The Westside and Mendocino Railroad Company tracks reached the future site of Fruto in 1888. Fruto was the last of five stops. The fourth was Athena, at mile 1/4 west of Willows (appeared in Southern Pacific timetables printed in the 1890s). The third was Millsholm, named for Edgar Mills when the spur to Fruto was built through his land in the 1880s. "Holm" is German for "hill" and this former railroad siding was located in the foothills 10 miles west of Willows.

 

Near the Fruto depot were cabins for workers. The railroad built a depot with living facilities for the station agent, offices and a freight storage area. The Company erected a water tank atop a tower. It constructed a roundhouse, warehouses for grain and hay, corrals and loading platforms for cattle, sheep and hogs. It planted palm trees and even made a small park beside the depot.[iii]

The passenger train made a daily morning trip to Willows, returning in the afternoon. At the same time, a freight train originated left Willows and returned in the afternoon. The employees were J. O. Thrower, conductor; A. Frisbie, engineer; and Charley Wickes, fireman[iv].

 

Excerpt from Joint Time Table #4 of Southern Pacific Company. Benicia Division, Clear Lake Division and Mendocino Branch dated 5 Sep 1888.

 

 

 

 

 

Fruto Willows area railroad lines – “Railroad Atlas of North America, California and Nevada”,

MikeWalker, Steam Powered Publishing, Dawes Road, Dunkirk, Faversham, Kent, UK, 1994. Used with permission.

  

Fruto roundtable

Originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

Fruto depot 

[The train depot was destroyed by fire in the 1950s and the site is now privately owned. The trees in the photos below are still there (2014) and mark where the depot stood. Not far away are pieces of a railroad spur and the old machine shop now used as a barn. Nothing else remains.]

Originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

 

Originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

End of the Fruto depot with Hardy "Harlie" Haskell and his wife Pearl.

Tom Haskell Collection originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

 

1888 

On May 15, 1888 the West Side & Mendocino was consolidated into the Northern Railway, the terminus at Willows.

 

By May 28, 1888 the real estate firm Easton Eldridge and Company of San Francisco had laid out town lots at the terminus and were running special trains from San Francisco to bring prospective buyers to Fruto. The town was laid out with northeast/southwest alphabetical streets A through I intersecting southeast/northwest streets Olive, Vine, Cherry, Oak, Orange, Chestnut, Walnut, and Fig. [In 2014 the only streets still in use are B Street south of Vine and D, G, and Cherry Street north of Vine. The C, G, and Cherry loop is commonly called Cherry Street. Vine Street is now State Highway 162. None of the other streets were ever developed.]

 

Map of Fruto, June 1888

 

 

 On July 1, 1888 the line from Willows to Fruto (16.84 miles) is officially opened for traffic as the Mendocino Branch of
Northern Railway/Southern Pacific's Benicia Division, Clear Lake Subdivision. This was duly noted in the Daly Alta California, Volume 42, Number 14174, 22 June 1888.

Opening announcement

Two weeks later on July 14th the Northern Railway was sold and consolidated into Southern Pacific.

 

The post office was established on July 2, 1888, and ceased operation on August 15, 1953.  [All the streets now are part of the Willows, California postal destination. Fruto is no longer a valid mail address.]

 

According to John Williams and his article on California Town postmarks, the Fruto postmark indicated Fruto, Colusa county from 1888 to 1891 and beginning in 1891 Glenn county.

 

October 1888

The Daily Alta California (Volume 42, Number 14299, 29 October 1888) reported the intentions of Easton, Eldridge & Co. to auction off Fruto lots. After November 15th Easton, Eldridge &. Co. -will have the city sales as usual on Tuesdays and the country excursions on Saturdays. Among prominent offerings to be held during the present season will be the subdivision and auction sale of the town site of Fruto, under the direction of the Pacific Improvement Company, in Colusa county. - The spot is the terminus of the branch road that leaves the main road in Colusa county at Willows, and running almost due west Will terminate eventually in Mendocino. The town site has been laid out and the original Fruto ranch has been subdivided into acreage parcels. It is proposed to run "an excursion from San Francisco on Saturday morning, making a special quick trip, in order to give the excursionists an opportunity to visit the property and return the same day.

December 1888

This article appeared in the Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 60, Number 91 under the headline "Excursion to Fruto"- Easton, Eldridge & Co., real estate agents and general auctioneers, advertise this morning a grand excursion for Saturday next to Fruto, a place about fifteen miles west of Willows, on the West Side and Mendocino Railroad. Fruto valley is said to be the coming rival for early fruit and vegetables to the renowned Vaca valley district. By order of the Pacific Improvement Company 200 choice town lots will be sold in the immediate neighborhood of the depot. Fruto, from its location, being the terminus of the West Side and Mendocino Railroad, and located in the midst of a valley of large area, and in an early belt of rich and warm land, must become the commercial center of the western part of Colusa county. An investment here must pay a very large rate of increase within a very brief period of time. Also, fifty small and early fruit farms, from 2 1/2 and varied sizes to 80 acres. These choice small and early fruit and vegetable farms adjoin the town of Fruto, are located in the valley of that name, and this location is certainly one of wondrous richness and of very early soil. It will certainly become the rival for early fruit and vegetable of the renowned Vaca valley district. This valley is protected from the cold north winds by a ridge of fine rolling hills, and at the same time the soil is exposed to the early spring sun, which warms the soil into a warmth that makes the face of nature smile in all its loveliness, and compensates the tiller of this toil with a profit that astonishes even the old settler, who now raises early vegetables for the large markets of the central and southern parts of this State. Basket collation on the train near Willows. The train will leave this city at 10:40 A. M.; San Francisco, 7:30 A. M. ; Davisville, 11:15 A. M. ; Woodland, 11:30 A. M. The fare for the round trip will be: San Francisco. $3; Sacramento, $3; Davisville, $3; Woodland, $2.50: Willows, 50 cents. For terms of sale and other particulars, see the advertisement in another column.

 

Fruto advertisement

 

A similar advertisement appeared in the Daily Alta California, Volume 42, Number 14339, every day beginning the 3rd and ending the 8th December, 1888.

1889

The Sausalito News, Volume 5, Number 3, 22 February in a column entitled "The Pacific Coast, The Cream of the News in a Nutshell" reports Orange trees are being planted in large numbers in the vicinity of Fruto, Colusa County. No other details.

This is followed on 8 March 1889 with An irrigation system is to be adopted for the land of the Fruto Improvement Company in Colusa county. The main ditch will be seven miles in length. 

1890

The 28 January 1890 edition of the Woodland Daily Democrat reported that “a number of Japs went north today to Fruto to work in the vineyards.

 

The 19 June 1890 Woodland Daily Democrat reported that the Clark’s Valley ranch of Senator John Boggs, comprising 13,000 acres situated near Fruto had been acquired by a San Jose syndicate, the Cornall-Futzhugh-Hopkins Company. It was a land swap with Boggs trading for 1,300 acres in and near Stockton. The Fruto land would be handled as a whole or in subdivision and offered at from $20 to $50 an acre. The value of the property was $200,000. (This was also reported in the Daily Alta California, Volume 82, Number 167, 16 June 1890.)

 

1891 

The county begins to issue death certificates. Before this date, deaths in the county were not recorded.

 

Considerable produce was being shipped from Fruto. It had a depot building, hotel, dance hall, saloon, general store, post office, and telegraph office. The Argonaut Land Company owned about 10,000 acres adjoining the town and was improving it and subdividing it into small tracts. Because the railroad tracks were in the center of town, commercial establishments were built on the south side (Vine Street) and the residential development occurred on the north side (Cherry Street).

 

Hotel. Used until about 1915 and then converted to a home. Destroyed in a fire.

Tom Haskell Collection originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

 

The Saloon. Photo courtesy of  "Wagon Wheels", used with permission. Still standing 2014.

 

 

 

Blacksmith shop, store, and house originally the home of the teacher moved here from near the schoolhouse 1918-1919.

Tom Haskell Collection originally published in "Wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

 

The Fruto Land and Improvement Company purchased 3,000 acres of land near Stony Creek with the intention of planting 250 acres of raisin grapes. An acre of raisen (sic) grapes will yield, when in full bearing, from two to three tons of raisins which are sold to the packers at about $90 ton, thus giving the a handsome return to the producer. The leading variety of raisen grape is the Muscat of Alexandria, otherwise known as the Muscatel[vi]. The Land Company dug a 6 mile irrigation ditch from Stony Creek to their land and used it for irrigating alfalfa.

 

Land speculation was alive and well. On 13 January 1891 these advertisements appeared in the San Francisco Call, Volume 69, Number 44.

AN IMPROVED HOME. CHEAP; 162 ACRES - good rolling foothill land: watered, well wooded; mostly under cultivation; near line of proposed extention of Fruto Railroad; only $12 per acre. MOORE & FOSTER. 634 Market St. 
 
VERY CHEAP: ONLY $10 PER ACRE; 3485 acres good rolling land; wooded: watered ; well improved: bearing orchard and vineyard; fenced; on line of proposed Fruto and Eureka Railroad; exceptional investment MOORE & FOSTER, 634 Market St. 

 

1892 

The Woodland Daily Democrat edition for April 11, 1892 reports that a locomotive that runs on the Fruto branch road passed through Woodland bound for repairs at the machine shop in Sacramento.

 

1893 

The Woodland Daily Democrat for 27 July 1893 reported that Rev. J. C. Pulliam left that day for Fruto where he was spending his vacation.

 

1894

The San Francisco Call for April 4th reports that a pension for Survivors of Indian Wars has been awarded to Jesse L. Beasley of Fruto, California. It also has an advertisement for 2,676 acres near Fruto priced at $27.50 per acre.

1895 

In the 1895 Atlas, Fruto is listed in Glenn country, with a post office, railroad, and express office.

1895 Map of Glenn County

 

The Pacific Rural Press, Volume 49, Number 14, 6 April 1895 gave this assessment of Fruto's crops: grain crops have grown fine under favorable weather, having had a splendid rain. Fruit and early vegetables have been badly damaged by frosts during the month. Apricots are almost a total failure, also early plums and cherries. Peaches will make a fair crop.

 

1898 

A Wagon Wheels article[vii] on the Westside and Mendocino Railroad relates this story: In 1898 the Northern Railway Company was acquired by the Southern Pacific and became a part of the great S.P. system. Not long after a strike was called by the operational and maintenance employees of the Southern Pacific. An interesting story of the part played by the little Fruto line in this strike was told by Clarence Wickes, son of Charley the fireman on the line, in his column “Wixie’s Recollections”. He wrote, “….the strike against the Southern Pacific tied up every wheel on the system except the Fruto branch which the strikers overlooked, so it continued on its regular runs. The Southern Pacific Company cancelled the seniority rights of the employees who took part in the strike, stirring up a very bitter fight that had the marks of a riot at Sacramento and Dunsmuir. . . . . The Governor called out Company G of the National Guard at Willows to be ready to protect the company property. At this point the strike was called off. The S.P. Company rewarded the Fruto crew with the high seniorities lost by the strikers. Thrower and Frisbie were given high rank and Wickes was called to Sacramento and promoted to engineer which was unusual at his age.”

 

The California Blue Book or State Roster was published. It has two Fruto residents: G. F. Behrens was a Notary Public in Fruto and J. O. Thower was on the Board of Agriculture for District 42.

 

1900

1900 U.S. Federal Census. The U.S. Federal Census enumerator doesn’t indicate on his census schedule where Fruto begins and ends or street/road identifications. This caused some difficulty in making sure the biographical section bellows included all the residents. Some names are probably missing. The best I could do was take the names on the 1910 through 1930 listings and try to find them in 1900. I found some in the third judicial township and some in the fourth.

 

1902

In 1902 there was a grammar (elementary) school in Fruto. The teacher was H. G. Rawlins[viii]. The school was a one-room affair and included grades 1-8. Another teacher was Kat Frasier.

 

1903-1904

Drought strikes as evidenced by this data reported in the San Francisco Call, Volume 95, Number 75, 13 February 1904. S. G. Bennett, hydrographer with the United States Geological Survey gave figures for the water flow for 1903-1904 as measured at Stony Creek at Julian's ranch near Fruto. The figures are for Second Feet (cubic feet per second).

Date   1903   1904
January 31   2,160   185
February 1   1,525   150
February 2   1,340   150
February 3   1,080   150
February 4   1,000   150
February 5   1,000   370
February 6   1,000   247

 

1905

November 20, Harry S. Gibbs is appointed postmaster.

1907

August 19th Johnnie Glusing of Fruto, and Ella T. Jansen were married in San Francisco by the Rev. J. H. Schroeder. (Reported by the San Francisco Call, Volume 102, Number 83, 22 August 1907.) 


1909
The San Francisco Call, Volume 105, Number 166 included this advertisement 15 May 1909
FINE GENERAL RANCH
376 acres; 100 acres under ditch: oldest water right on Stony creek; no water .tax; 45 acres alfalfa; good stand; 2OO acres farming land: balance wood and pasture; large barn for 150 tons hay; smaller barn, fair house. -etc.; small orchard and berries; 10 miles from Fruto school on land: this is a paying property: $25 per acre.
Country Dept. HOI.COMB - REALTY CO.
(Investor of Capital)
300 San Pablo av.
Oakland. Cal

1910

1910 U.S. Federal Census. The U.S. Federal Census enumerator listed the families and identified those on Vine and Cherry Street. The heads of households in 1910 were: George Prentice, Charles Schmidt, Edwin Bunnell/Burnell, John Zumwalt, David Pelton, Mabel O’Brien, and Frontier Parsons.

 

1914

On 20th of September, S. H. Rice publishes his “Rice’s Official Map of the County of Glenn, State of California”. Fruto has platted streets. There is only one road in and out of the town, the current County road 162.

 

1917 

The railroad is now hauling copper ore from the Frank Tendor Copper mine. But the town of Fruto still had not been able to attract many permanent residents. This 1917 map shows which town lots had actually been recorded and sold. Many of them were never built upon. [still to be determined is what event caused this new survey].

 

 

 

During World War I and also WWII the train carried chromite ore or chrome concentrate from the mines west of Chrome to smelters in the Bay area.[ix]

Ore truck from the mine at Chrome dumping ore in railroad card.

Tom Haskell Collection originally published in "wagon Wheels", used with permission.

 

By 1917 copper ore from the Frank Tendor copper mine between Stonyford and Fouts was being trucked to the railhead at Fruto.[x] But activity at the station was slowing. The resident agent was eliminated and the station was closed.

 

1919

The Pacific Rural Press, Volume 97, Number 17, 26 April noted that E. D. Connolley of San Francisco had purchased 5,000 acres in Fruto.

 

1920

1920 U.S. Federal Census. The map used to determine the enumeration districts was Rice’s Official Map of the County of Glenn State of California, published by S. H. Rice in 1914. The U.S. Federal Census enumerator did not indicate on what streets the families lived. The heads of households in 1920 were: William Shields, Andrew Davis, Frontier Parsons, Richard Bedford, Ammiel Landberg, Paul Thomassen, John Haskell, Jesse Haskell, James Cronin, Douglas Crum, Joe Perry, Oscar Lyon, Dryden Garnett, William Hudson, Louis Bonne, John Campbell, John Soeth, and Frank King. The only commercial activity appearing in Business and Credit Directories is the business of A. Landberg[xi]. His general store business is small, the estimated financial strength is $5,000 to $10,000, and his credit rating is fair. [The store building (square, corrugated metal) is still standing in Fruto.]

 

1923

Fruto has a population of 58. Its residents must go to Willows for banking services. A. Lanberg is still the only business being credit rated.[xii].

 

1927 

The Fruto station is re-opened and a resident agent is assigned in order to accommodate the shipment of dam materials for the Stony Gorge Dam, Orland Project. The dam materials were shipped out on the Fruto line and then to the dam site 12 miles away. The dam, 5 miles west of Fruto, was completed in 1928, a concrete slab and buttress structure with a height of 139 feet and a crest length of 868 feet. Behind it is a fishery with 18 miles of shoreline and boating and camping facilities.

 

The spur was also used to ship cattle to market. Southern Oregon ranchers partnered with Fruto area ranchers grazing their cattle in Oregon in the summer and around Fruto in the winter. The cattle were penned on the outskirts of Fruto before loading onto trains. The pen area was triangle shaped on the west part of the town and extended the length of the town on the north. All the properties on the north side of Cherry Street have a 30-foot easement that was part of the route from the pens to the loading dock.

 

1930

1930 U.S. Federal Census. The map used to determine the enumeration districts was Rice’s Official Map of the County of Glenn State of California, published by S. H. Rice in 1914. The U.S. Federal Census enumerator simply indicated that all the residents were on Willows Fruto Road. The heads of households in 1930 were Amiel Landberg, Jesse Haskell, Irvin Larabee, Samuel Larrabee, Thomas Sheehy, Raymer Garnett, Warren Larrabee, Floyd Vaughn, Richard Nichols, Elmer Mudd, Frank Green, Samuel Stormer, Sylvan Stormer, Frank King, Oscar Pitzer, Worthy Vanderford, Richard Bedford, Charles Bedford, Louis

 

1938

Doane Cancels were the Post Office Departments first attempt to improve postmark legibility by issuing rubber hand stamps. The name honors Edith R. Doane a Postal Historian who became interested in these early 20th Century Hand stamps in the 1950's. She published her first research findings in 1978. The Fruto Post Office used the Type 2 cancels with 2 sets of railroad track type bars with a number in them. The cancel was used from 30 Sep 1904 until 4 Apr 1909. In the entire United States approximately 17,500 Type 2 Doane Hand stamps were issued.

Fruto Postmark from May 21, 1938

 

 

1939-1940

Fruto schoo class 1939-40

 

The Class of 1939-1940 at the Fruto school. Front row L-R: George Owen, Jim Larrabee, Barbara Mudd, Tom Owen. Middle row: Dick Mudd. Top row: Mrs. Alta Haskell( teacher), Stella Hampton, unidentified Hampton, Clyde Hampton.

 

1942-43

Fruto school 1942-1943

 

The Class of 1942-1943 at the Fruto school. Front row L-R: David Soeth, Lloyd Owen. Back row L-R: Mrs. Mulford (teacher), two Mulford grandsons, Tom Owen, George Owen, Betty Burrows.

 

1948

The Glenn County Directory lists these heads of families in Fruto: Albert Campbell – farmer; Jesse Haskell(Bessie) – watchmaker; Thomas E. Haskell(Adrienne) – laborer; Mrs. Josephine King – farmer; George Roeth – farmer; Robert L. Spence(Cleo) – grocery and exchange; and Carl Studebaker(Bertha) – laborer.

 

1950

The train depot is destroyed in a fire.

 

1951 

In 1951 the branch railroad tracks to Fruto were removed with the exception of a one-mile section west of Willows. This was the new terminus and it handled wood products produced in the Setzer Box Company mill in Elk Creek.

  

1953

The post office is closed on August 15th. The residents' mailing addresses are now Willows, CA rather than Fruto, CA.

1959

The one-room school closed after 1959. The last teacher was Mrs. Marie Farrell. The students were sent to Elk Creek or Willows depending on where they lived.

 

1993

Southern Pacific leases their "West Valley Line" (Davis - Tehama), including the small portion of the Mendocino Branch serving the Johns-Manville Fiberglass Plant east of Willows, to the California Northern Railroad.

 

2014 

There are no longer any commercial buildings in Fruto. The railroad machine shed is now a barn, the saloon building is long abandoned, and the school is a private home. There are ten homes in town of which three are historical – the former elementary school, the home of Tom Haskell, and the home and workshop of his father Jesse Haskell the watchmaker.

Graveyards

Fruto itself did not have a graveyard. Most people were interred in Elk Creek. However, Tom Haskell, a long time resident” related this story in 2004. “I could another little piece of history you can put in the article but some may not be good to advertise tho some I know would get a kick out of it. Fruto had a graveyard. A man was buried there. No one seems to remember his name. When I showed Mr. Frank King Sr. where the grave was he put a small hog brooder house on top of it. I haven’t seen the spot for years but once there was a little depression there. The spot is close to where a man built a small reservoir in the creek and digging up dirt to make the dam he rooted out lots of Indian bones.”  “In about 1913 the train brought my great aunt out from Willows. There was very little gravel on the roads in those days. But when the big black hearse from Elk Creek loaded her on, it was all four big black horses could do is pull over the divide from here to Elk Creek.”

Biographies

Who was the first child born in Fruto? Leonard Landberg has stated that he was. But another resident, Tom Haskell, believes otherwise. This is what Tom says: “I just learned a few years ago he (Leonard) said he was the first born in Fruto, the store keeper…. His folks at the time ran the store. I’ve no idea if they owned it or just run it a while. But when the eventful day came the Dr. from Willows came out (I can’t recall his name now). But it was a hot day. They rented a horse or maybe I should say team (I wasn’t here) and drove to Alder Springs. There was a hotel and store there. In mountain air, a lot cooler. I was the first born in Fruto. When the fated day came, Dr. C. W. Lund boarded his Cadillac roadster to make the trip from Willows. The road had been recently graveled so the vibrations put out his curbside lights. He stopped at the Millsholm railroad depot, borrowed a kerosene lantern and hung it on his radiator cap. Got here just in time. Several in the neighborhood, with the railroad crew, were in the card parlor, the saloon playing cards when the stork went over. ….. I may be the only child in history I know in Fruto.”

 

In a letter from G. David Singleton 4 May 2008 he says his father Hal Addison Singleton was born in Fruto February 12, 1899 to George Isaac Singleton and Ollie Troxel Singleton.

 

Who lived in Fruto? I have tried to document everyone who lived in or near Fruto from its beginning until 1930, that person's parents, and that person's children. For privacy reasons I have tried not to include details on living people. (Click here to go directly to the individual or surname indexes.)

Bibliography

 

Last update 20 October 2014


 

[i] Colusa County, Op cit.

[ii] Wagon Wheels, Colusi County Historical Society, Volume XX, Number 1, 1970, The Westside-Mendocino Railroad, author unidentified, p. 21.

[iii] Wagon Wheels, Colusi County Historical Society, Volume 52, Number 2, Fall, 2002, Fruto Still Exists, Richard Johnson.

[iv] Ibid.

[v] Wagon Wheels, Colusa County Historical Society, Volume XXXV, Number 1, 1985, Schools of the Past by Sybil Spence Hicks, p. 12.

[vi] Colusa County, Its History traced from a state of nature through the early period of settlement and development to the present day, Justus H. Rogers, Orland, California, 1891.

[vii] Ibid. pps. 21-23.

[viii]Schools of the Past, Op cit., p. 12.

[ix] Wagon Wheels, Colusi County Historical Society, Volume 52, Number 2, Fall, 2002, Fruto Still Exists, Richard Johnson.

[x]Wagon Wheels, Colusa County Historical Society, Volume XXX, Number 2, 1980, Copper Strikes Caused Stampede to Indian, Bear Valleys in 1863 by Robert L. Johnson, p. 18.

[xi] Businesses, Manufacturers, Merchants and Tradesman for Glenn County, California 1920, compiled from the R.G. Dun Mercantile Agency Reference Book and published by Aaron’s Books, 146 South Broadway, Salem, Ohio, no publication date.

[xii] Businesses, Manufacturers, Merchants and Tradesman for Glenn County, California 1923, compiled from the R.G. Dun Mercantile Agency Reference Book by Carl Millison Jr., published by NSN Books Genealogy and Sewing Shop, March 2003.

[xiii] Ancestry.com. California Death Index, 1940-1997. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original electronic data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940-1997. Sacramento, CA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, 19--.

[xiv] Ancestry.com. California Death Index, 1940-1997. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original electronic data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940-1997. Sacramento, CA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, 19--.

[xv] “The Chinn and Meyers Families”, Randie Myers, Ancestry.com FamilyConnect.

[xvi] Ancestry.com. California Death Index, 1940-1997. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original electronic data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940-1997. Sacramento, CA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, 19--.

[xvii] California Cemetery Records Glenn County 1940-1970, Sacramento Valley Chapter Daughters of American Colonists, compiled by Mrs. F. Joseph Watts, Chairman Genealogical Records Committee.

[xviii] Ancestry.com. California Death Index, 1940-1997. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original electronic data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940-1997. Sacramento, CA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, 19--.

[xix] Marcus and Mary’s information is in California Cemetery Records Glenn County 1940-1970, Sacramento Valley Chapter Daughters of American Colonists, compiled by Mrs. F. Joseph Watts, Chairman Genealogical Records Committee.

[xx] Ancestry.com. Yuba, Sutter, Colusa, Butte, and Tehama Counties, California Directory, 1885. [database online] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 2000. Original data: Yuba, Sutter, Colusa, Butte, and Tehama Counties, CA, 1885. Oroville, CA: L.M. McKenney & Co., 1885.

[xxi] Social Security Death Index.

[xxii] California Cemetery Records Glenn County 1940-1970, Sacramento Valley Chapter Daughters of American Colonists, compiled by Mrs. F. Joseph Watts, Chairman Genealogical Records Committee.

[xxiii] California Death Index.

[xxiv] Mainard family information from Patti Oakley McFarlin “Our Family’s Heritage” at www.ancestry.com.

[xxv] 1850, 1860 Linn County Missouri Census Project, electronic database at worldconnect.rootsweb.com, compiled by Jeff Bailey (JeffreyRBailey@aol.com), 18 December 2003.

 

Most recent update 2 Nov 2015.
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